Cooking for Sukkot: Part 1

It’s holiday season in Jewish land! Which means a TON of feasting. And a ton of cooking.

This time of year has been scary for me the past few years, because I have to figure out how to cram multiple feasts into my lifestyle, keeping in mind my three times a week rule and the everything homemade rule.

First of all, I need to give a shoutout to my mom and sister who made Rosh Hashana so much easier than it would have been. They slaved for a while to make sure I could eat well.

And now, it’s up to me to finish off the season with Sukkot. Luckily, I’m not cooking ALL six meals (Wed dinner – Sat lunch, not including breakfasts). Just 3 large ones, contributing one dish to a potluck, and having small meals that are just for me. Still, this kind of task can be daunting. For anyone, but especially when it comes to specific dietary needs.

But I am proof that it’s doable!

Here’s night one of cooking — recipes are either stolen or from my gut, or a combo. My apologies for the low quality pictures. Just go back in time to when Blackberries were the bomb diggity, and you’ll be like, WOAH, your phone took that picture???

Also, these are for two separate meals. More sides for each of these meals to come…

Herbed Chicken

Herbed chicken:

chicken , canola oil, garlic, oregano, thyme, black pepper. Cook at 400 until the juices run dry, anywhere from 30-45 minutes

Butternut Squash Kugel

Butternut Squash Pie/Kugel

http://www.joyofkosher.com/recipe/butternut-squash-souffl/

In the above recipe, I use frozen butternut squash cubes that I stick in the food processor. It’s also AMAZING with oat flour, but use 3/4 cups instead. This is my first time making it with maple syrup and cinnamon. Substituted ginger for nutmeg.

Eggplant Parmesan

Eggplant Parmesan

Sauce: tomato puree, garlic, oregano, thyme, parsley, cayenne pepper, salt, pepper

Cook in layers: sauce, small pieces of eggplant, pizza cheese, sauce, eggplant, pizza cheese, sauce, eggplant, cheddar cheese, sauce, parmesan cheese. Cook at 400 for 30 min covered, then 10 uncovered.

 

Gnocchi in maple butter sauce

 

Gnocchi in maple butter sauce

Gnocchi: http://allrecipes.com/recipe/gnocchi-i/ (make sure to follow this recipe. I recently tried to make this while I was exhausted, and wound up reading the instructions wrong and mixing the flour without the sweet potato. And then I had this whole to-do where I burned my fingers. And then the gnocchis wouldn’t stick. I wound up with what I call inside out ravioli casserole. It was DELECTABLE. But ugly. Not that these gnocchi are gorgeous, but they are at least a shape.

Sauce: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/giada-de-laurentiis/sweet-potato-gnocchi-with-maple-cinnamon-sage-brown-butter-recipe/index.html – I substituted parsley and garlic for cinnamon, pepper, and sage. We’ll see how it goes!

Tons more to cook before Wednesday. But I’m happy and proud. I can eat really interesting, fun dishes. No need to be bland just because there are foods I can’t eat!

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2 responses

  1. Sounds exhausting but fun! Just reading your recipes- the chicken- I’m guessing it should be ’till the juices run CLEAR’, not dry- cause, um, if you cooked it until there was no juice left, it wouldn’t be very good. ;-). Also, eggplant Parmesan- you have to cook the eggplant slices first, right? Otherwise it would be very watery, and the eggplant wouldn’t be done. The butternut squash pie sounds like a good substitute for pumpkin pie. Is it traditional to do it without a crust? Looks very good- and easy to make gluten free that way.

    • You’re right, I did mean clear. Wow, exhaustion!

      I actually don’t precook the eggplant. I have in the past, but I don’t actually notice a difference in taste, and this way it takes less time/fewer dishes. Since the eggplant is doused in sauce and cooked covered, it actually cooks just fine in the parmesan state. Doesn’t get too watery and definitely gets cooked.
      The squash is traditional without a crust, though, I’m sure it would be fine with one. Just substitute the white flour with a gf one — I like oat flour, though I know to get it certified gf is really expensive — and you’re good to go!

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