Food Challenge Round 40: Cindy vs. Lox

When I was a child, one of the things I wanted most in the world was to grow up and eat chocolate covered lox. Now, before you gag, understand: my friends/peers would only make me feel bad about being allergic to two foods — chocolate, because what kids don’t like chocolate; and lox, because it’s a staple of the American Jewish diet. I hadn’t ever tasted either, so I assumed if everyone loved both, eating them together would be stupendous. I’d tell my family and my doctor that when I grew up, I’d eat chocolate covered lox.

Today, I learned that dreams do come true — just not how you’d expect.

I challenged lox today in my second post-Xolair challenge. It started off like spinach — touched it, rubbed it on my fingers, freaked out about my lack of hives. Did ya’ll know fish is super slimy? Gross.

Then it stopped being like spinach.

I took a bit of the lox — like a sliver the size of my thumb — and put it in my mouth. Spit it out on the doctor’s desk almost immediately and shouted “WHAT THE FUCK IS THAT?” Fish, it seems, is an acquired taste.

I didn’t want to eat more. It was vile. And slimy. And gross. But I want to be able to eat fish. So, after whining overdramatically and having the nurse come in to soothe me, I took a bite. I swallowed. I SWALLOWED FISH. LIKE A SEA LION. I haven’t swallowed fish in years — maybe since I was a toddler. Never swallowed lox. It never got that far.

I then asked the nurse if I could take a bite of chocolate to fulfill my dream. She said sure. With the taste of lox fresh on my tongue, I ate a piece of chocolate. And you know what I have to say to all you naysayers out there who gagged in the beginning of this post? The tastes sort of blended. Like chocolate covered pretzels. Bittersweet chocolate with a salty smoky edge. If Gwyneth Paltrow “Goop’ed” it the whole world would be on that like it was a kale chip.

My dream of opening a lox and chocolate factory was soon dismantled. I got extremely nauseous. The doctor tossed me his trash bin. I didn’t use it. But I started feeling off. Ear burning, throat scratchy (though that was solved with water). My vision was intact and there was no sign of hives — both the typical symptoms I’ve gotten from touching fish — but I was lethargic, cranky, and groggy. Also typical symptoms of close encounters with the sea kind.

I stayed for monitoring and just kept getting more nauseous. The doctor gave me Claritin, which helped. We assessed that I can’t eat lox, though if I want to, I can challenge other fish and other cooked salmons (I may not want to). We also assessed that my threshold had significantly changed — I could now swallow fish without a severe reaction. A reaction not even worthy of Benedryl! This means I can touch it, I can be near it, and most importantly — I can now go to restaurants, not just in LA, but anywhere careful.

Am I disappointed that I can’t eat fish? Sort of. Am I cranky because I still don’t feel great? Sure am. But, I’m also really happy, and here’s why:

1. I grew up to eat chocolate and lox, and even though I’d given up on that dream long ago, it still feels great to have achieved it, even for a moment. The world is never how we expect it to be, but it sometimes surprises you and lets you have a taste of something you really really really wanted. I’m feeling very empowered.

2. I can now get closer to fish than ever before. I can feed a sea lion. I can go to the New York Aquarium and touch the starfish. As a kid, when we’d go there on class trips, I’d sit in the hallway by this fountain thing and wait until my whole class had touched the fish and soaped their hands. No chaperone ever stayed with me (seriously, the 90s were cool) and while my friends joined me once they were done, I was alone for most of the time and bored to tears — and also sad. Like, really left out sad. But now, I can touch the fish like the rest of them. Also, zoos and aquariums aside, I can be around fish eaters. Cooking just got so much easier for large family gatherings. I can clear off a plate that had lox on it and help my dad out after he’s done eating. That’s big.

3. It’s confirmed that the food challenges I’m set to do to keep assessing the Xolair aren’t for naught — each allergen will have a different threshold, and it’s important to find out what they are. But they’ll all be better. BETTER. That’s pretty damn good.

A keeper at my old stomping ground, the Prospect Park Zoo. I could be her!

A keeper at my old stomping ground, the Prospect Park Zoo. I could be her!

FOOD CHALLENGE TALLY

Cindy: 28

Allergens: 5

Next Up: Vote?

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Cindy vs. The World: A Testimony of an Environment Allergy Scratch Test Panel

NURSE

“Cindy, you can’t anything, and you can’t go anywhere. What do we do?”

Flash back to twenty minutes earlier…

I had my scratch today. I was so beyond excited, if for no other reason than it meant I could go back on antihistamines. I was fine on Shabbat, but as soon as Sunday aka Day 2 rolled around I was done with the world. I felt like a junkie, counting down the hours until I could go back on Zyrtec.

After a pretty horrific drive in the LA rain to the doctor’s office (thank God his office is a mile away, in practically a straight line. Because some of us had questionable eyesight and reaction time this morning and all of us in this city drive like morons in the rain), it was time for the test. We tested 72 different environmental allergens. For those of you who haven’t had the pleasure of having a scratch test, what happens is the nurse pricks your arm with a histamine to make sure your skin reacts in general. Then, she pricks your back with a series of little white plastic things that just tap an allergen to your skin. Each plastic bracket is marked to indicate a different allergen. After 25 minutes (or less but usually not), the nurse and doctor return to evaluate how big the bumps get. You may have no bumps. You may have 72. The severity of the allergy is indicated by a number 1-4 and a letter A-D, referring to the scope of the redness and the height of the bump (ie swelling). Imagine the worst mosquito bite possible. It’s like 50 times more burny and itchy than that.

Anyway.

The nurse said she’d come back after 5 minutes, instead of 25, since my history is you know, severe and I react quickly. She came in after 2, but we still had a ways to go (I mean, I was in pain, but we weren’t finished yet). Then she came in at 5 and called the doctor in. He waited a couple more minutes and at minute 8 came in and sighed. I asked him to take a picture. He said I wouldn’t want to see it. Then he got out the sheet and started noting things. Forty seven things, to be exact, many with a 3C, some 2Bs, 3Bs, a 4B and two 4cs.  I was allergic to 46/75 foods, so I guess this is just my ballpark lucky number range. If only roulette went up to the forties…

I don’t know what half the things I’m allergic to are. The names are all scientific. But it’s every tree and grass and dust, some weeds, some mold but not most, cats (like astronomically) dogs (which is preposterous since I’m around dogs all the time and I’m fine), goats (but I loved Elvis my zoo goat!), rabbits (guess I won’t get a pet), not horses (thank God!!!), and not cottonseed (which is a lie, since that was all anaphylaxis-y when I ate it). These scratch tests aren’t 100% accurate. But they are accurate enough that shots will help.

Anyway, I got some cream, some antihistamines, and spent the rest of the day like a worn out zombie who needed to soak in a tub of oatmeal. I can’t tell you how many times I wanted to just scream. My clothes hurt. I had to wear a skimpy dress that’s basically too big on top and backless with a comfy loose sweater over it so that nothing would hit my hives. I’m glad I work in an environment where that’s okay, because if I had to dress up for work I’d have stayed home. One zyrtec, one claritin, a bunch of steroid cream and vaporub later, and it’s time for my Zyrtec. As I write this I am trying not to scream. I screamed earlier, when I was doing the math for the Scoggins Report (which, ps, ya’ll should subscribe to, because it’s awesome and also SpecScout is awesome), and realized that I’m sick of movies being action thrillers. Somehow, I think I’m more mad at the hives and expressing it poorly. Either way. Yelling is cathartic.

The bright side, though — because bright sides are the only sides I like to see — I now know why I can’t eat on certain days, I know why I don’t feel well often, and I’m finally going to get shots to fix it. I can’t believe what my body fights through every day, and I feel so beyond blessed that I am as healthy as I am. I hope in 3-5 years when the shots do their thing, I’ll be able to stand a lot more foods just by virtue of the fact that my body won’t be fighting the outside and the food at the same time. Just one demon at a time.

Now, if you’ll excuse me, I have to go lather more cream on. Maybe rinse off the hives, too. Rap til I feel better. Or, sing Christina Aguilera’s “Keeps Getting Better” because that song helps everything.

Food Challenge Round 5: Cindy vs. Onion

It’s hard to believe that I’m already up to my fifth food challenge. Considering I have what feels like a billion more to go, it’s actually kind of seeming like time flies. Wheat still feels new, I’ve still only had the one beer, and I already figured out how to compensate for the lack of pasta. And with my 7:30am doctor’s appointments, I haven’t even been late to work these last few times. You know how some people miraculously find time in their week to go to the gym, and they keep that routine for the foreseeable future? That’s how my food challenges are. Once a week, I wake up early to dedicate an hour or so to my health. Only, instead of working out, I eat while my doctor watches me.

That’s the same, right?

Anyway, on to the topic at hand. Onions. Or, should I say, a sweet yellow onion cooked in a soup or stew or the like (ie: boiled). Because that’s what I challenged today. The results are only applicable to sweet yellow onions cooked in soups or stews (yes, that includes cholent) or the like (ie: boiled).

The good news is, the results are positive! I can now eat sweet yellow onions cooked in soups or stews or the like (ie: boiled).

Just barely, though.

As my mother said when I made my weekly, “post challenge debriefing call,” — “You can’t barely pass a food challenge. It’s not like a math test where you get a 65, not a 64, so the teacher lets you pass. You’re either sick or you’re not.”

Well, I guess foods are more like math than I thought (maybe that’s why I’m so bad with them!). See, I was fine. I was “perfect” as the doctor joked. Except, while eating my chicken soup, I got a crazy sinus headache and felt all funny but not bad funny, just not normal funny. I wasn’t sick enough to give up onions for good, but I also wasn’t interested in finishing the whole bowl of soup (though, I did finish the half of the onion. Like a certain person I know at the Brandeis Chabad. Though, J, you can have the onion, every time. Not interested).

The doctor said it was not enough of a reaction for a Benadryl, but an Allegra, Zyrtec, or Claritin might do me well, if I had one on hand. I didn’t. He said next time, bring one (Claritin, because I already take Allegra and Zyrtec daily). This time, just move on with my life.

It’s also totally possible my reaction was due to the pasta reaction followed by an airborne horseradish reaction, followed by a feverish virus, accompanied by jetlag. My body might just be rebelling. In any case, I did learn that I have to be a little careful, as in avoiding leafy greens and other occasional airborne allergens when I eat sweet yellow onions cooked in soups or stews or the like (ie: boiled).

So it was an iffy, pass which is why I think I only passed onions in this very specific form, but hey. It’s something. Onions in soups are kind of a big deal. And I hate sauteed onions anyway. And onion powder – not something I miss in my own cooking but at all. Sure, it would be nice to eat it in other forms, but whatever. Next time. Like lifting the heavier weights at the gym…sometimes you just tackle that hurdle the next time.

Food Challenge Tally

Cindy – 3

Allergens – 2

Up Next: Tahina

Anyone who has awesome, simple homemade tahina recipes, please let me know!